Navigation Menu

Sachem’s Hole,” also known as Buc-uskkil, resting place, is the site where the late Manhasset Sachem Poggatticut was laid upon the ground as he was being brought from Shelter Island to Montauk for interment in 1651.

From that point on, the area was always kept clear of leaves and debris by local tribal members traveling that route until the site was eventually destroyed by Turnpike 114.

A historical marker erected in 1935 by the State Education Department stands on that spot today.

 

5I5A4540-1-1024x683 Sachem's Hole Jeremy Dennis On This Site

“Sachem’s Hole,” also known as Buc-uskkil, resting place, is the site where the late Manhasset Sachem Poggatticut was laid upon the ground as he was being brought from Shelter Island to Montauk for interment in 1651.

From that point on, the area was always kept clear of leaves and debris by local tribal members traveling that route until the site was eventually destroyed by Turnpike 114.

A historical marker erected in 1935 by the State Education Department stands on that spot today.

 

5I5A4540

More Information»

Whale’s fin is a sacred site for the Shinnecock, located two and a half miles south west from the current reservation and two miles south east from Canoe Place. Here, the whales were known to beach, potentially as an offering for sustenance to the Shinnecock in the area.

More Information»
Missi Kesukut

Missi Kesukut

At Great Sky

Missi Kesukut is a sacred site that was first preserved in 1991. In 2006, a skull was found in the area, identifying the area as a cemetery and at one time an Indian village. This discovery led to several years of local indigenous groups to dispute whether the area should be developed or remain as it is.

Today, Missi Kesukut is protected by the town district who allocated Community Preservation Funds to purchase the land from the private land owner for it’s preservation.

More Information»

A single fenced grave marks the burial location of Reverend Paul Cuffee. This site was chosen for his burial as it was once the meeting place for the old Indian church location. It also exists within “Good Ground,” the old name of Hampton Bays.

Cuffee, a Shinnecock Indian, was a celebrated minister, like his grandfather Peter John, who preached to Indians of Long Island. Cuffee, during his youth, was an indentured servant to a Wading River farmer who then became an enthusiastic convert in his early 20s. Cuffee preached among Indian communities, including the Poospatuck Reservation (present day Mastic Beach); Canoe Place in Hampton Bays, and in the end, Montauk. These vigorous preacher’s services were attended by large crowds.

His broken grave marker reads: In testifying the Gospel of the Grace of God He finished his course with Joy on 7th of March 1812 Aged 55 years and Three Days.

More Information»
Raconkamuck

Raconkamuck

Boundary Fishing-Place

Ronkonkoma was once a fresh water pond with a prehistoric village settlement.

Many nineteenth and twentieth century legends are associated with this site.

Today, the water of Lake Ronkonkoma has been deemed too toxic for swimming.

More Information»
Manitou Hill

Manitou Hill

Hill of the Great Spirit

Manitou Hill is a sacred hill located on what is now known as Manetto Hill in Plainview, New York. An oral story, recorded by historian Gabriel Furman in 1874, describes a legend during a great drought. The Manitou instructs a sachem through a dream to stand at the top of Manetto Hill and fire an arrow into the air, and on the spot where the arrow lands, people should dig until they find water.

The water spring that was found, called Mascopas, is now beneath a local high school athletic field.

Manitou is known in traditional systems as the powerful and unseen power throughout the universe, being present during moments of the miraculous and mysterious.

More Information»

This sacred glacial erratic marks the location of what may have been both the Shinnecock Fort and June Meeting location in the Shinnecock Hills. There have been many references to a contact-period Shinnecock fort, but the specific location has likely been disrupted by development.

June Meeting is a Presbyterian and Algonquian inspired celebration and gathering for Eastern Long Island tribes started by Reverend John Cuffee in the 1700s and continued annually on the first Sunday in June. It’s a time of dance, feasts and the passing down of stories and traditions. The Unkechaug tribe continue this traditional seasonal celebration in the western town of Mastic.

According to Shinnecock oral history, this site, similar to other council rocks, were the places for indigenous leaders to gather for important meetings.

Today, this land is located off of the current bounds of the Shinnecock reservation. The town of Southampton bought and preserved the area using it’s Community Preservation Fund for it’s cultural significance.

More Information»

The Canoe Place Chapel, erected circa 1820, was the primary Shinnecock church while they still resided at Canoe Place.

The chapel is undergoing renovation to be used for social gatherings.

 

More Information»

Listing Results

  • Sachem’s Hole

    Sachem’s Hole

    Post-Contact

    Read more
  • Whale’s Fin

    Whale’s Fin

    Late Woodland

    Read more
  • Missi Kesukut

    Missi Kesukut

    Early Woodland, Late Woodland

    Read more
  • Rev. Paul Cuffee Gravesite

    Rev. Paul Cuffee Gravesite

    Contemporary

    Read more
  • Raconkamuck

    Raconkamuck

    Archaic, Early Woodland, Late Woodland, Orient (Transitional), Paleo-Indian, Post-Contact

    Read more
  • Manitou Hill

    Manitou Hill

    Archaic, Early Woodland, Late Woodland, Post-Contact

    Read more
  • Fort Shinnecock

    Fort Shinnecock

    Post-Contact

    Read more
  • Canoe Place Chapel

    Canoe Place Chapel

    Contemporary, Post-Contact

    Read more