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The Unkechaug Nation maintains a sovereign relationship with the State of New York, other Indian Nations in the United States and Canada and other foreign powers. The Unkechaug Nation is located on the Poospatuck (“where the waters meet”) Reservation in Long Island, NY.

Under the provisions of colonial laws and later under the New York State Constitution (Article 12) the State of New York formally recognized the Unkechaug Nation of Indians in the 18th century. 1500 acres of land that had been long held by the Unkechaug and that continued from an original land agreement entered into with the King of England and the Unkechaug in the 17th century was set aside for the exclusive use of the Unkechaug. Today, that allotment has been stripped down to 55 acres; nevertheless, the affinity of the people to the land is as strong as in the past, if not even stronger today. The total population of tribal members, families, and extended relations is 450 of which approximately 250 reside on the Poospatuck Reservation. Housing density, and occupancy levels are unacceptable when measured against the rate of population growth and available land as well as the number of tribal members who want to return to their traditional homeland. The Unkechaug are faced with a rate of population growth greater than the national average and an increased demand for tribal services. Housing is an important priority but efforts to expand housing for tribal members are blocked by a lack of land. The Unkechaug are committed to increasing the land base in order to meet the needs of their members. 1

  1.  https://unkechaug.wordpress.com/about/
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The territory of this chieftaincy was adjoined by the Matinecocks on the west and extended eastward from the Nissequogue River to Stony Brook and south to the center of the Island. Apparently, there was a disagreement for a time between the Nissequogue and Matinecock Indians concerning their boundary and, as a consequence, they did not always enjoy friendly relations. They had extensive villages at Smithtown and at several other places near the shore within the bounds of their territory.

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Four prehistoric human remains were found at Reeve Farm Site in 1961, sparking public and  archaeological attention. For decades following, local residents flocked to the farm in an attempt to uncover more remains and artifacts.

The skeletal remains were purchased by the Bridgehampton Historical Society and displayed there for several years.

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Manhansack-aqua-quash-awamock

Manhansack-aqua-quash-awamock

Island Sheltered by Islands, Shelter Island

Manhansack-aqua-quash-awamock, the traditional Algonquian name for Shelter Island by the Manhanset group who lived there from pre-historic time until the seventeenth century; is approximately 7907 acres in area. This island is unique for having the largest glacial erratic boulders on Long Island, resulting from the Wisconsonian glacier.1

  1. Englebright, 1982
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Fort Pond in Montauk was once called Konkhunganik by the Montaukett Indians before and during the 1800s at its southern half and Quanuntowunk for its north shore.

This site along the south eastern shore was occupied seasonally during the Late Woodland Period (1,200 – 350 years ago) as a recurring base camp for nomadic hunter-gatherers and their extended families.

As early as 1661, the place name Konkhunganik was recorded from Montauketts during the creation of a land deed. The translation of Konkhunganik is currently unknown, but early 20th centruy anthropologist William Wallace Tooker believed the name translates to “at the boundary.”

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Raconkamuck

Raconkamuck

Boundary Fishing-Place

Ronkonkoma was once a fresh water pond with a prehistoric village settlement.

Many nineteenth and twentieth century legends are associated with this site.

Today, the water of Lake Ronkonkoma has been deemed too toxic for swimming.

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Manitou Hill

Manitou Hill

Hill of the Great Spirit

Manitou Hill is a sacred hill located on what is now known as Manetto Hill in Plainview, New York. An oral story, recorded by historian Gabriel Furman in 1874, describes a legend during a great drought. The Manitou instructs a sachem through a dream to stand at the top of Manetto Hill and fire an arrow into the air, and on the spot where the arrow lands, people should dig until they find water.

The water spring that was found, called Mascopas, is now beneath a local high school athletic field.

Manitou is known in traditional systems as the powerful and unseen power throughout the universe, being present during moments of the miraculous and mysterious.

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Noyack

Noyack

A Point, Corner of Land

Noyack was once a village site with evidence of dwellings, burials, cooking hearths, animal remains, and tools. Evidence of both Niantic culture and Sebonic culture are found in the area.

Noyack takes its name from the long point or neck of land now known as Jessup’s Neck, at one time called “Farrington’s Point.”1

  1. William Wallace Tooker, Indian Place Names on Long Island, 1911, pp. 166
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Pahquahkossit

Pahquahkossit

Wading River

Pahquahkossit is a winter camp site located in what is now known as Wading River. Based on prefishtail arrowheads found, the site is identified as an archaic period settlement, with evidence of occupation as early as 2595 BC.

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Listing Results

  • Unkechaug Indian Reservation

    Unkechaug Indian Reservation

    Archaic, Contemporary, Early Woodland, Late Woodland, Orient (Transitional), Post-Contact

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  • Nissaquogue

    Nissaquogue

    Archaic, Early Woodland, Late Woodland, Orient (Transitional)

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  • Reeve Farm Site

    Reeve Farm Site

    Archaic

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  • Manhansack-aqua-quash-awamock

    Manhansack-aqua-quash-awamock

    Archaic, Early Woodland, Late Woodland, Orient (Transitional)

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  • Konkhunganik

    Konkhunganik

    Archaic, Early Woodland, Late Woodland, Paleo-Indian

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  • Raconkamuck

    Raconkamuck

    Archaic, Early Woodland, Late Woodland, Orient (Transitional), Paleo-Indian, Post-Contact

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  • Manitou Hill

    Manitou Hill

    Archaic, Early Woodland, Late Woodland, Post-Contact

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  • Noyack

    Noyack

    Archaic, Late Woodland

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  • Pahquahkossit

    Pahquahkossit

    Archaic

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