Empire of Water – The Church in Sag Harbor, NY – March 27 – May 30th 2022


Event Details


EMPIRE OF WATER

The exhibition runs March 27–May 30

Artists from all over the globe are represented in this fascinating show about our most common, most valuable, and most endangered element, water itself.

In the exhibition, the theme of water is depicted as a natural element, a scientific subject, an issue of social justice, an historical factor, an ecological question, an aesthetic tradition, a metaphor, and a simple necessity for the existence of life on Earth. From the plentiful resources it provided to Native Americans before first contact to the area’s maritime history, including colonization and slavery, the area’s long-standing tradition of agriculture, as well as the current economic importance of the ocean and beaches as the motor of the region’s tourism and leisure industries, fresh and salt waters have defined the historic communities on the East End of Long Island since their inception.

Artists represented are:
Doug Aitken, John Alexander, Linda K. Alpern, Cappy Amundsen, Tonico Lemos Aud, Conrad Bakker, Daniel Beltra,  Ross Bleckner, Scott Bluedorn, Edward Burtynsky, Jim Campbell, Vija Celmins, Wu Chi-Tsung, Jeremy Dennis, Thornton Dial, Rineke Dijkstra, Inka Essenhigh, April Gornik, Lawren S. Harris, Tim Hawkinson, Bryan Hunt, Cy Keener, Anselm Kiefer, Sigalit Landau, Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Longo, Liza Lou, Sally Mann, Paton Miller, Steve Miller, Malcolm Morley, Vik Muniz, Chris Ofili, Duke Riley, Alexis Rockman, Clifford Ross, Julian Schnabel, Yinka Shonibare, Hiroshi Sugimoto, teamLab, Andy Warhol, Fred Wilson
The theme of water is depicted as a natural element, a scientific subject, an issue of social justice, an historical factor, an ecological question, an aesthetic tradition, a metaphor, and a simple necessity for the existence of life on Earth. From the plentiful resources it provided to Native Americans before first contact to the area’s maritime history, including colonization and slavery, the area’s long-standing tradition of agriculture, as well as the current economic importance of the ocean and beaches as the motor of the region’s tourism and leisure industries, fresh and salt waters have defined the historic communities on the East End of Long Island since their inception.

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